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Reviewed by: Ben Felix Prolific documentarian Michael Moore is back with another triumph in his newest film Where to Invade Next. Moore takes American arrogance and society and turns it on its head in the most cynical, tongue-in-cheek way possible, by showing the gaping differences between American culture and that of countries across Europe and Africa. The audience is taken on a journey throug

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Tuesday 8 March Dunstan Playhouse Reviewed by: Masya Zabidi   The perils of both fast paced technology and mass industrialisation is cleverly explored in 1927’s electrifying production of  Golem. The play’s Terry Gilliam style animations skilfully conceals (or enhances) weighty themes such as the negative influence of media and technology and the loss of individuality

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Thursday, 4th March Noel Lothian Hall, The Botanic Gardens Reviewed by: Kate Riggs According to the Bunker Trilogy website, Stephen Fry called the Trilogy 'wonderful.' In a gobsmacking turn of events that absolutely no one saw coming, Stephen Fry and I agree. Morgana is the second play of Jethro Compton Production’s Bunker Trilogy that reimagines traditional stories and myths

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Review: Miss Julie Words: Emma Doherty Miss Julie is an interesting choice for the University of Adelaide Theatre Guild. A play about the dalliances between an aristocrat and her servant, and the consequences, this play is like an episode of Downton Abbey if there were more unhinged emotional rollercoaster characters (and no Maggie Smith). Rosie Williams plays the titular character in thi

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Review: Metalhead Words: Eddie Satchell Metalhead is a film about an Icelandic family whose lives are affected in various ways by the death of a son and a brother. It’s a film about the nature of music; the way that it personifies our surrounding world. This personification sometimes comes in the form of a consoling friend, sometimes a caustic demon.  This is especially so for Her

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Review: Roman Tragedies Words: Max Cooper A six-hour performance of Shakespeare’s Coriolanus, Julius Caesar and Antony and Cleopatra that you'd need subtitles for doesn't necessarily sound too inviting – but it was one of the best theatrical experiences of my life.   To begin with, the acting was astounding. From the opening scene with Frienda Pittoo

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